Valemount Entices Tourists With New Visitor Information Centre

Village of Valemount

2012- The Village of Valemount completed construction of a new Visitor Information and Interpretive Centre in 2007 that also houses the village's municipal offices, and markets the wide range of tourism and recreational opportunities the Valemount area has to offer visitors. This project was undertaken with the support of Northern Development, and has increased tourism from passing motorists due to its strategic location at the cross roads of the Yellowhead Highway and Valemount's 5th Avenue.

The project has also resulted in the building of an interpretive visitor information system which now holds a number of educational exhibits on the history of the area. The centre is also equipped with meeting space available for local non-profit societies and a gift shop where local artisans can display and sell their work. It is has become a popular tourist stop but also a local hot spot with its playground and picnic areas.

During the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics, the centre held 80 people to watch the opening ceremonies and was open throughout the entire event. The students from CNC organized the media room for spectators during the games.

"When the Olympic/Paralympic Live Sites program was announced in 2005, Valemount's Council had a dream and saw the opportunity. But it was only with the contributions of Northern Development and the Columbia Basin Trust that this dream became a reality."

Silvio Gislimberti, Economic Development Officer, Village of Valemount

Positive Economic Impacts in Valemount

The Village of Valemount's Visitor Information Centre is taking advantage of the 866,640 motorists who on average pass through the community each summer. Studies show that visitor information centres significantly increase the amount of visitor stops substantially, and the Village of Valemount is now taking advantage of this new community asset.

The local First Nations artist Julia Thrasher, has been quite successful using the centre to sell and market her work. She specializes in pointalism of Inuit art and wildlife from the Northwest Territories and BC. The art is made up of millions of tiny points which are used to colour in her artwork.