Apply For Funding

If you are interested in learning more about any of Northern Development's funding programs, please don't hesitate to call the office at 250-561-2525 to speak to a member of our team.

Business Development

Forest Innovation FundCompetitiveness Consulting RebateConnecting British Columbia

Community Development

Economic Diversification InfrastructureCommunity Halls and Recreation FacilitiesCapital Investment AnalysisMarketing InitiativesCommunity Foundation Matching GrantsBusiness Façade Improvement

Capacity Building

BC Hydro GO FundEconomic Development Capacity BuildingFabulous Festivals and EventsGrant Writing SupportGovernance Essentials Scholarship

Partner Programs

August 2014 - Newsletter

Northern Development approves $250,000 for Logan Lake Campground expansion

Upgrades will generate a significant increase in tourism revenue for the community

Logan Lake

The District of Logan Lake plans to expand the Logan Lake Campground with an additional 12 new campsites and to complete upgrades to the existing portions of the facility.

The District of Logan Lake will be expanding the Logan Lake Campground with the addition of 12 new campsites, while simultaneously upgrading portions of the existing facility.

Logan Lake is an ideal community for attracting outdoor enthusiasts and campers from across the province. The community offers a pristine natural environment of mountains, lakes and forests, making Logan Lake the perfect destination for mountain biking, hiking, dirt biking and horseback riding. The Logan Lake Campground expansion is a much-needed foundation of support for the community in order to satisfy the increase of recreational tourism to the area.

New picnic tables and fire pits will be installed at all of the campsites, which will also be graded again for improved comfort and access.
The fire pits will be built with recycled brick taken from the Logan Lake Village Plaza, which recently underwent renovations.
The landscaping and irrigation system will also be upgraded, and a new fish gutting station will be installed for visiting anglers.
Accessibility between the campground and the neighbouring golf course will be improved, increasing the ease with which pedestrian traffic will flow between these two amenities.

With visitor rates increasing during the past few years the campground expansion is essential for the community to capitalize on potential tourism revenue.

Since local hotels and motels are often fully utilized during the summer, the campground is one of the only places in town where visitors to Logan Lake can easily find a place to rest and relax. For many travellers, the Logan Lake Campground has the potential to act as a base to explore the region.

Northern Development’s $250,000 grant is being provided through the Trust’s Economic Diversification Infrastructure program, which provides up to $250,000 in funding to municipalities, regional districts, First Nations and non-profit organizations in Northern Development’s service area for projects that significantly strengthen the local economy via a major capital investment.

Quotes:

“Logan Lake is a true gem and worthwhile destination for visitors to B.C.’s Thompson Nicola region. These campground upgrades will make it easier for tourists to stay in and enjoy all that the community has to offer,” said Evan Saugstad, Chair, Northern Development Initiative Trust.

“The Logan Lake Campground improvement project will see an important community resource revitalized and expanded.  These improvements will drive tourist and resident attraction for Logan Lake by providing a focus for marketing and a first impression that visitors will not soon forget,” said Derek de Candole, Economic Development Officer, District of Logan Lake. “Northern Development funding is crucial to the implementation of this project and has acted as the catalyst for securing the remaining funding.”

“The Logan Lake Campground Improvements are long anticipated improvements that will better the community," said Mayor Robin Smith, District of Logan Lake. "We are very excited to be able implement our campground improvement master plan and couldn’t have done it without Northern Development Initiative Trust.”

Quick Facts

• Projections forecast incremental revenue increase of $245,588 over five years, which represents a 66% increase over current annual revenues.
• The additional revenue is expected to be generated from the rental of 12 new campsites, as well as increased interest and demand for existing campsites after revitalizations are complete.
• In 2013 there were 3,148 campsite rentals which brought thousands of visitors to Logan Lake. During this time, the municipality grossed over $70,000 which allowed the hiring of four staff for the summer season.
• Northern Development has previously approved campground upgrade projects for the Village of Queen Charlotte, the District of Stewart, the Williams Lake Indian Band and the Soda Creek Indian Band.
• This is a multi-phase project and is expected to commence in the summer of 2014 and continue into 2015.

 

Contact

Joel McKay
Director, Communications
Northern Development Initiative Trust
joel@northerndevelopment.bc.ca
250-561-2525

Northern Development approves $250,000 for North Peace Airport parking upgrades

Trust board of directors backs major investment in Fort St. John airport infrastructure

North Peace Airport
Photo Credit: David Dyck, Alaska Highway News

The North Peace Regional Airport is expanding its parking facilities again to meet ongoing demand from increased passenger traffic. In July, Northern Development’s board of directors approved a $250,000 grant to support the expansion.

Increased economic activity in the region, mostly related to the oil and gas sector, has continued to put pressure on the airport. Passenger traffic through the airport in 2013 totalled 186,104, representing a 30% increase in traffic compared with the year before. North Peace Airport expects total passenger numbers in 2014 to exceed 200,000.

The increased traffic has placed renewed demand on short and long-term parking at the airport. In 2013, an additional parking lot was built at the airport that included 100 stalls for general parking and 100 stalls for car rentals. That upgrade also received a $250,000 grant from Northern Development.
This latest parking project includes an additional parking lot that consists of 175 stalls, a renovation to the older parking lot and the creation of three bus lanes to accommodate crew buses. The proposed project is part of the North Peace Regional Airport terminal groundside plan completed in February 2013.
The upgrades have the potential to generate $2.9 million in additional airport revenue in five years. The project will also create up to four direct full-time positions and 10 temporary construction jobs.

The North Peace Airport Society will contribute the remaining funding necessary to complete the project, which totals $2,135,000. Northern Development’s $250,000 grant is provided through the Trust’s Economic Diversification Infrastructure program, which provides funding to municipalities, regional districts, First Nations and non-profit organizations in Northern Development’s service area for projects that significantly strengthen the local economy via a major capital investment.

In response to an economic boom throughout the region, Northern Development approved more airport infrastructure projects in 2013 than ever before. The Trust has funded 18 airport improvement projects throughout central and northern B.C. since 2006, in the amount of $14 million. That $14 million has leveraged $113 million in airport expansions. Since 2006, the Trust has approved funding for airport projects in Anahim Lake, Bella Coola, Vanderhoof, Burns Lake, Fort St. John, the Northern Rockies, Prince George, Smithers, Mackenzie, Prince Rupert, Fraser Lake, Masset, Quesnel and for the Xeni Gwet’in Community Airport in the Chilcotin. The Trust can provide grant funding for airport projects in its service region through its Capital Investment Analysis, Economic Diversification Infrastructure and Marketing Initiatives programs. To learn more, check out our recent Airport Info graphic.

Quotes
“The growing economy in the North Peace is continuing to place pressure on the North Peace Airport. This grant will not only support necessary upgrades to the airport, but also create new jobs and generate new revenue for the local economy,” said Janine North, CEO, Northern Development Initiative Trust.

“The expansion of the parking lot will benefit residents and travelers from across the region,” said Karen Goodings, Board Chair, Peace River Regional District.

“Industry and business also benefit from the parking lot expansion with increased parking and expanded rental car options. The ongoing support from Northern Development for North Peace Regional Airport projects assures that the airport is able to continue to address the region’s increased travel demands,” said Fred Jarvis, North Peace Airport Society Chair and Mayor of the District of Taylor.

Quick Facts

•Northern Development Initiative Trust is an independent regional economic development corporation focused on stimulating economic growth and job creation in central and northern British Columbia.
•To date, the Trust has committed $125 million in funding to nearly 1,500 economic development projects and programs in communities throughout central and northern British Columbia.
•Northern Development has approved $500,000 in funding for North Peace Airport projects in the last two years
•Passenger traffic through the airport in 2013 totalled 186,104, representing a 30% increase in traffic compared with the year before.
•North Peace Airport expects total passenger numbers in 2014 to exceed 200,000.
•Northern Development has approved more than $14 million in funding for airport upgrades throughout central and northern B.C. since 2006
•Northern Development Initiative Trust is an independent regional economic development corporation focused on stimulating economic growth and job creation in central and northern British Columbia.

Contact
Joel McKay
Director, Communications
Northern Development Initiative Trust
joel@northerndevelopment.bc.ca
Phone: 250-561-2525

Northern Development approves $250,000 for Tumbler Ridge Tourist Information Centre

Post and beam structure will support local economic diversification

Tumbler Ridge
Northern Development has approved funding for a number of tourism information centers including Williams Lake, Chetwynd, Quesnel, Alexis Creek, Valemount as well as the Central Coast Regional District.

The District of Tumbler Ridge has placed economic diversification near the top of its priority list as it moves forward with the development of a new tourist information centre. In July, Northern Development’s board of directors approved a $250,000 grant to support the development of a post and beam information and interpretive centre that will showcase the area’s local history and unique attractions.

Tumbler Ridge, a community of 2,700 in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, is home to several unique attractions, including dinosaur fossil tours, a palaeontology research centre and Monkman Provincial Park’s Kinuseo Falls, which is taller than Niagara Falls.

The community’s new tourist information and interpretive centre, a $1.5 million project, will include large open spaces, vaulted ceilings, wheelchair accessibility, a meeting room, gift shop, local history sections and also house offices for the local chamber of commerce and community development officer.

The community’s current visitor information centre is a small 30-year-old building that is only used during the summer months. The proposed multi-use tourist information centre would be open year round and serve as one of the main multi-use facilities in Tumbler Ridge. The new building will generate more than $100,000 in new revenue for the community in the next five years, mostly from facility rentals and souvenir sales.

Northern Development has previously approved funding for additional tourism information centers in the region including the communities of Williams Lake, Chetwynd, Quesnel, Alexis Creek, Valemount as well as the Central Coast Regional District.

Northern Development’s $250,000 grant is provided through the Trust’s Economic Diversification Infrastructure program, which provides funding to municipalities, regional districts, First Nations and non-profit organizations in Northern Development’s service area for projects that significantly strengthen the local economy via a major capital investment.

Quotes
“Tumbler Ridge is home to some of the most unique and valuable natural tourism assets in British Columbia, and this new facility will help the community promote those attractions and strengthen the local economy,” said Evan Saugstad, Chair, Northern Development Initiative Trust.

“As a community we are delighted that once again Northern Development has supported and shared our vision of diversification of our local economy. Having the support of the Northern Development at this time is critical as our community moves forward through challenging times,” said District of Tumbler Ridge Mayor Darwin Wren. “We are a stronger, more resilient community with this support and we are very thankful.”

“The Tumbler Ridge Chamber of Commerce is excited to be involved in the operations of the new visitor center in Tumbler Ridge,” said President of the Tumbler Ridge Chamber of Commerce Roxanne Gulick. “The Chamber feels year round operations of this new building will lead to new growth opportunities for many different businesses in our area. We want to thank the District of Tumbler Ridge and Northern Development for their parts in this great opportunity.”

Quick Facts

• Northern Development has already approved 17 projects through the Economic Diversification Infrastructure program in 2014, with a combined total funding commitment of $3,621,283
• To date, the Trust has committed $125 million in funding to nearly 1,500 economic development projects and programs in communities throughout central and northern British Columbia.
• The Tumbler Ridge Tourist Information Centre is a $1.5 million project that will include large open spaces, vaulted ceilings, wheelchair accessibility, a meeting room, gift shop, local history sections and also house offices for the local chamber of commerce and community development officer
• Northern Development has previously funded the development of tourist information centres in Valemount and Williams Lake.

Contact
Joel McKay
Director, Communications
Northern Development Initiative Trust
joel@northerndevelopment.bc.ca
Phone: 250-561-2525

How Northern Development uses leveraging to expand capacity

Every month we bring you a new infographic about the Trust, its activities or economic development in Northern B.C.

This month we decided to bring a little learning to the table by creating an infographic that teaches about leveraging and how the Trust utilizes it.

From Doom to Boom: Q&A with Kitimat EDO Rose Klukas

Economic Development Officer, District of Kitimat

Image

From doom to boom – the District of Kitimat’s local economy has rebounded with billions of dollars in existing and proposed major industrial developments.
Only a few short years ago, the town of 9,000 faced an exodus of locals in the wake of two industrial plant closures.
But now, with a variety of major projects planned and underway such as Rio Tinto Alcan’s aluminum smelter upgrade, LNG Canada, the Pacific Trails Pipeline and Coastal Gas Link project, Kitimat appears to be the king of economic development comebacks.
But how did the District pull it off?
Northern Development recently got in touch with Rose Klukas, Economic Development Officer for the District of Kitimat, to get the run down on the doom times, the District’s investment focus and how it plans to overcome growing pains and capitalize on the coming surge of development.

Q:You were raised in Kitimat – what do you love most about working and living here?

A:My parents arrived in Kitimat from Europe in the summer of 1954. I love the history I have here, recognizing the huge risk my parents took coming to a brand new community, under development and very remote, to raise their kids. Growing up I enjoyed the advantages of living in a small town with good amenities … largely taking for granted the great recreation facilities we had, the multi-cultural climate, the close proximity of everything and the outdoors we love so much. These are the same reasons my husband and I chose to stay in Kitimat to raise our family.

Q:Methanex’s methanol plant closed in 2006. The Eurocan pulp and paper mill closed in 2010. How did you see that affect the community? How did it affect your life?

A:Kitimat has always prided itself on a diverse economy. By the early 1980’s we had three major industries operating in the community. When the methanol plant closed its doors in 2006 it was a big hit to our small town. Ironically, the plant closed due to the high price of natural gas because of a shortage of gas in North America … how quickly things change!

When the pulp and paper mill announced its 2010 closure the community definitely felt the blow. On a personal level, my husband’s job was a casualty of that closure. It had a significant impact on my family. We personally fretted over the possibility we might have to move elsewhere in Canada to find work. I say fretted because we love Kitimat and wanted to raise our teenagers in this town. While the summer of 2010 was a very uncertain time in Kitimat, by the end of 2010 Kitimat LNG filed for a natural gas export license. That was the beginning of unprecedented interest in industrial development in Kitimat. A year later Rio Tinto Alcan made its final investment decision to build a new aluminum smelter. This project has significantly boosted the local economy and has been a good taste of things to come.

Q:What’s the single biggest change you’ve seen in Kitimat in the past two years?

A:The feeling of optimism in Kitimat’s future is by far the best change that has happened in the past two years. While we are not completely certain which projects will come to fruition, we do know the world has recognized Kitimat’s potential for development, its location on year-round, ice-free tidewater close to overseas markets.

Q:Well-positioned for Asia Pacific trade, Kitimat claims to hold the title for the most cost-effective northwest transportation corridor port. What are a few additional comparative advantages that make Kitimat so appealing for trade and investment?

A:People ask me if I’m surprised at the amount of interest there is for development in Kitimat. I tell them ‘no.’ The same attributes that attracted Alcan Aluminum Company to Kitimat in the 1950’s are drawing new industry to Kitimat today. A deep, year-round, ice-free port, close to Asian markets with room to grow. A history that includes industry … meaning citizens have an understanding of what it’s like to co-exist with industry.

Q:With a spike in industrial development, there are always residual growing pains. For Kitimat, the housing shortage seems to be one of the largest challenges. What are the current steps that the District of Kitimat is taking to help alleviate this issue?

A:We have seen dramatic uptake in activity in a short period of time here in Kitimat and will likely continue to see growth for the foreseeable future. There are a number of steps the District of Kitimat is undertaking to mitigate this situation and prepare for the future, including participating in the community’s social impact committee. A housing committee also exists. In 2012, a housing study was produced and a new study will be released in the fall. Meantime, the District of Kitimat has introduced new by-laws, for example, offering incentives to local homeowners to add secondary suites to their homes. As well, there’s discussion about the possibility of allowing coach houses in Kitimat. So the municipality is addressing these concerns in a very real way.

Q:With more than $18 billion in potential projects proposed, Kitimat could have a very promising future ahead of it. What is the District’s economic development vision over the long term?

A:Kitimat’s economy is largely based on industrial development. Industrial taxation keeps residential property taxes low (I believe second lowest in B.C.), and allows the community to have good amenities often only seen in larger communities. As natural gas projects come on stream, I think we will see value-added to natural gas projects return to the valley … perhaps methanol or other gas-to-liquids projects. This is in keeping with Council’s desire to advocate for value added projects. As technology changes, it will be interesting to see how renewable energy projects gain ground in the region. While it may be years away before reliable sources of renewable energy replace traditional energy sources, it is something we are keeping our eyes on here in Kitimat.

But industry is only one facet of the potential that exists here. I believe there is a huge opportunity for entrepreneurs to start their dream business, with room to think outside the box. We live in a day and age that recognizes the importance of a creative economy – using talent, culture and ideas to develop a business. We support this type of thinking!

Tourism is another area that we will see growth, perhaps in the traditional sense – fishing and outdoor adventures – and maybe in a less conventional sense – industry tours. After all we hope to see the first export LNG facility in Canada come on stream here in Kitimat.

Q:What are Kitimat’s barriers to growth and investment? How do you plan to overcome them?

A:I’m definitely a glass half full kind of a gal … we are willing to work with investors to think of creative solutions to challenges. Having said that, change does bring growing pains. While many investors are interested in Kitimat, locating suitable land can be challenging. And while we encourage higher density building plans, we recognize we need to ensure infrastructure can support these new, higher numbers. Labour, being a global commodity, is also a concern. We know we need to attract thousands of construction workers, never mind all the workers to support all other businesses in Kitimat. But none of these challenges are insurmountable.

Q:What’s the number one message you want to get out to potential investors about Kitimat?

A:Kitimat, although a fairly young community, has had a fairly strong and stable economy throughout its history. We expect that to continue with industrial development over the next few years. But opportunities in Kitimat aren’t limited to industry. I encourage anyone who has a creative idea for business or commercial development to come chat with me. There’s definitely room here for the creative thinker!

Northern Development partners to prepare local businesses for the 2015 Canada Winter Games

Northern Development has approved $13,425 in funding to bring a series of business readiness workshops to Prince George in preparation for the 2015 Canada Winter Games.

Northern Development is helping to prepare businesses to gear up for the 2015 Canada Winter Games.
In partnership with Initiatives Prince George, Downtown Prince George and Community Futures Development Corporation, the Trust is working to bring several Canada Winter Game business readiness workshops to Prince George.

These three-hour workshops will take place this fall to help better position all hospitality and retail business owners, managers and supervisors to support the demand before, during and after the Games, which will be the largest event ever held in northern B.C.

The business readiness workshops will be held on Tuesday, September 9th at 9:00am and Wednesday, September 10th at 2:00pm at the Initiatives Prince George office.
Ted Topping, president of Creative Insights Incorporated, will lead the Canada Winter Games business readiness workshops.

Topping is an expert in his field, working as a speaker, trainer and consultant for more than 25 years. He has led numerous workshops on business strategy, inventory management, marketing, selling and service across North America.

The key elements of these workshops will help local businesses handle traffic increases as well as to help them to understand the stamina the 2015 Games will demand.
Additional deliverables from these workshops include:
• Teaching business owners to see their businesses from a customer’s perspective
• Learning the importance of offering unique Games-worthy products and services, helping businesses better convey clear and consistent strategic messages through advertising
• Helping business to plan their staffing and inventory by examining the real-life experience of businesses that served the 2011 Canada Winter Games in Halifax

The 2015 Canada Winter Games presents several different economic benefits and opportunities for northern B.C. businesses including procurement and business expansion.
Northern Development provided funding through the Trust’s Competitiveness Consulting Rebate program.
The Competitiveness Consulting Rebate program provides a rebate to small and medium sized companies engaged in manufacturing, innovative technologies, resource processing, transportation, distribution and their first line suppliers for outsourced consulting services.

A rebate of up to 50% to a yearly maximum of $30,000 can be recovered for the cost of external business consulting projects.
Projects must focus on increased productivity, new or incremental revenues, profitability and/or job creation.

For more information about the workshops and to sign-up for a session, please visit the registration page.

The deadline to register is September 5, 2014.

Quotes

“By contributing resources from the Competitiveness Consulting Rebate program, we anticipate that dozens of businesses in the Prince George region will get valuable hands-on tools to increase their business capability and effectively manage inventories, operations and customer service for large scale events,” said Renata King, Director, Business Development, Northern Development Initiative Trust.

Quick Facts
• The Competitiveness Consulting Rebate program provides a rebate to businesses to offset the cost of consulting and consultant travel for qualifying projects
• Companies may access customized consulting services to suit their unique business requirements
• Companies may use a preferred consultant or obtain assistance to identify and select a qualified consultant(s) with a verified track record of competitiveness consulting expertise
• Direct payments to reimburse the company within weeks of receiving verified completion of the consulting services contract
• The workshops will be held on Tuesday, September 9th at 9:00am and Wednesday, September 10th at 2:00pm at Initiatives Prince George.

Contact
Joel McKay
Director, Communications
Northern Development Initiative Trust
joel@northerndevelopment.bc.ca
Phone: 250-561-2525

Success Story: Otway Technical Building readies Prince George to host major ski competitions

Location: Prince George Date: July 2014

The Otway Nordic Centre is ready to host the 2015 Canada Winter Games thanks to the local business community.

The Caledonia Nordic Ski Club’s new technical building at Otway Nordic Centre in Prince George has been built to meet International Ski Federation standards, which will allow the club to host nationally sanctioned sporting events and generate new revenue for the local economy.
But the club, which has more than 1,800 members, couldn’t have done it without community support.
In addition to the $30,000 grant from Northern Development Initiative Trust to help build the technical building, dozens of companies and organizations supplied equipment and donated supplies or services to make the building a reality, proving that the club has strong support locally.
For example, forestry giant Interfor donated the cedar siding, Conifex Timber provided lumber, All West Glass helped with windows and doors and Carrier Lumber provided help moving supplies to the site, to name a few.
The building is designed to provide space for officials to make it easier for the club to host competitions ranging from major national and international events to youth and local recreational ski competitions.
The technical building can also host running, cycling and multi-sport events such as the Prince George Iceman, and will serve as a new administrative support building to expand the club’s athletic programs.
Earlier this year, the club was able to better host the Haywood NorAm Western Canadian Cross-Country Ski Championships, which helped generate in excess of $1 million of economic impact for the local economy.
Northern Development’s funding was provided through the Trust’s Community Halls and Recreation Facilities program, which provides municipalities, regional districts, First Nations bands and registered non-profit organizations with up to 50% of a project’s budget to a maximum of $30,000 in funding to improve or expand existing facilities.

Testimonials

“The technical building provides us with the ability to host more competitions than ever before and further develop and expand our athletic programs,” said Jim Burbee, Director of Competitions, Caledonia Nordic Ski Club. “This building is a game changer for us as a club and we simply couldn’t have done it without the community support we received.”

“The Otway Technical Building is an example of a recreation project that not only generates new revenue for the region, but also will allow an important recreation facility to expand and offer more services for the local community,” said Brenda Gendron, CFO, Northern Development Initiative Trust.

Quick Facts

• The Caledonia Nordic Ski Club is the largest ski club in the province with more than 1,800 members
• The club’s new technical building at Otway has been built to meet International Ski Federation standards, which will allow the club to host nationally sanctioned sporting events
• Northern Development provided a $30,000 grant to support construction of the new building
• 20 businesses and organizations provided supplies, services and their time to help make the building a reality
• In 2014, the club hosted the Haywood NorAm Western Canadian Cross-Country Ski Championships, which generated more than $1 million of economic impact for the Prince George area

Key numbers

•    $30,000 – the amount of funding Northern Development contributed toward the development of the Otway Technical Building
•    $247,600 – the estimated project budget for the technical building
•    $207,560 – the value of monetized donations from community partners and private investors
•    20 – the number of local businesses and organizations that donated supplies or services to make the technical building a reality
•    $1.1 million – the economic impact of the Haywood NorAm Western Canadian Cross-Country Ski Championships held at Otway in 2014
•    1,800+ – the membership of the Caledonia Nordic Ski Club

Funding partners
Caledonia Nordic Ski Club

Contact
Jim Burbee
Director of Competitions
Caledonia Nordic Ski Club
competitions@caledonianordic.com
caledonianordic.com

Brenda Gendron
Chief Financial Officer
Northern Development Initiative Trust
brenda@northerndevelopment.bc.ca
www.northerndevelopment.bc.ca